Do not copy any of my artwork, poetry or photography without my permission.

Do not copy any of my artwork, poetry or photography without my permission.
....carpe diem. The Daylily. "Be like the flower, turn your face to the sun." Khalil Gibran. She gives her all for just one day then bows her head to God and fades away to nourish the next generation. God I pray I may give my all each day to honor you and bow my head at the end to nourish the next generation. Peggy Jones. NOTE............ Please folks do not copy any of my art or photos on my blog without my permission. Thank you for your good manners.

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Friday, March 25, 2011

Sepia Saturday # 66-First Ladies

Sepia Saturday

First Ladies Official Dresses

As displayed in the 
U.S. National Museum,
Smithsonian Institution

Sarah Childress Polk
1803-1891
First Lady 1845 to 1849



From my new postcard collection 

On the back
Genuine Curteich-Chicago


I found a web site that has a guide for dating postcards published by the Curteich -Chicago Co
If it has .
1898- 1Cent postage

Sarah Childress Polk was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, the third of six children. Although raised in the rugged Western Frontier, Sarah grew up amidst wealth and refinement. Her father, Joel Childress, was a successful businessman and planter.
Although an education was scarce for frontier girls, Sarah attended a local school and, in 1817, was sent to Salem Academy in North Carolina. This school was considered one of the best in the South. The unusually strong curriculum included English grammar, Bible study, Greek and Roman literature, geography, music, drawing, and sewing. Sarah's education was cut short, however, by the death of her father.
While James K. Polk was a Tennessee Legislator, he began courting Miss Childress, and on January 1, 1824, James and Sarah were married at her parents' home near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The young couple moved to a cottage in Columbia, where Mr. Polk could concentrate on his law practice and political career.
Sarah's education would serve both her and her politically ambitious husband well. As James K. Polk embarked upon his long national political career, Sarah acted as his secretary by keeping her traveling husband aware of local political events. Because of her ability to intelligently converse about politics, she was respected and befriended by some of the great politicians of the day.
As First Lady, Sarah Childress Polk quickly endeared herself to the country. She was a strict Presbyterian, and changed the image of the President's House. She curbed the tradition of heavy drinking and dancing at White House social functions. In charge of completely remodeling the State floor of the President's House, she created an elegant setting befitting the highest office in the land.
After four years, Sarah looked forward to her husband's retirement where they could live quietly in their new home, Polk Place, in Nashville. Their quiet retirement did not last long, however, as James K. Polk died just three months after leaving Washington. A 45 year-old widow, Mrs. Polk donned the black clothes of mourning for the rest of her life.
Not long after James K. Polk's death, Sarah became the guardian of an orphaned great niece. This "adopted" daughter, Sally Polk Jetton, would remain with Sarah for the rest of her days. Mrs. Polk was honored at Polk Place throughout her life, and was considered the “grande dame” of Nashville for over four decades. After a short illness, Mrs. Polk died at Polk Place in 1891, just short of her 88th birthday, forty-two years beyond her illustrious husband.




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Way to go Kentucky!!!!!!!!!!


Go BIG BLUE WILDCATS !!!!!!!




19 comments:

Postcardy said...

Interesting postcard and history. Polk is one of the Presidents that I don't really know anything about.

Titania said...

Interesting post, a lady ahead of her time.

(Queenmothermamaw) Peggy said...

Postcardy, my thoughts exactly. I did not know much about him and definitely not about her. I was glad to find this post card. Thanks for visiting.

Looks like the country was lucky she was his wife, Titania.

QMM

Howard said...

Funnily enough I knew about Polk, but knew nothing about his wife Sarah.
Interesting that she stopped heavy drinking and dancing at the Whitehouse. I think they should do a bit more of that today. Fascinating story and a really nice postcard. Thanks for sharing.

Howard said...

Funnily enough I knew about Polk, but knew nothing about his wife Sarah.
Interesting that she stopped heavy drinking and dancing at the Whitehouse. I think they should do a bit more of that today. Fascinating story and a really nice postcard. Thanks for sharing.

Howard said...

Funnily enough I knew about Polk, but knew nothing about his wife Sarah.
Interesting that she stopped heavy drinking and dancing at the Whitehouse. I think they should do a bit more of that today. Fascinating story and a really nice postcard. Thanks for sharing.

barbara and nancy said...

That was so interesting about Sarah Polk. I knew nothing about her. She sounds a bit like Hillary except for the no drinking & dancing in the White House.
Love the postcard too. Such a pretty dress.
Nancy
Ladies of the Grove

Pondside said...

Even from the old picture, you can see that she was a beautiful woman.

imagespast said...

Thanks for the history :-) What an elaborate hairdo she has - it must have taken ages to do! Jo

Alan Burnett said...

An amazing card and an amazing dress. What must it have been like to wear something so - the only word I can think of is "monumental".

Rudee said...

We've had some very strong first ladies. This one seems particularly astute. Her dress was amazing.

On a different note--I think every Michigander owes Kentucky thanks today for putting Ohio State to bed. Lights out for them, for sure. So thank you, Kentucky!

Tattered and Lost said...

Oh, I bet she had some tongues clucking. No drinking or dancing. Bet that didn't go over too well.

I remember seeing the display of first lady dresses at the Smithsonian. Quite wonderful. At that time it only went up to Nancy Reagan.

Marilyn said...

What a wonderful card and I enjoyed studying her dress. It's magnificent. I enjoyed the history about Sarah too. A great SS post.

Betsy said...

What a beautiful postcard! And I did not know her history...or if I learned it in history class it has long been forgotten!

Karin said...

Wonder who was the designer of her dress! Very interesting! She did get to be of a good age - for those years! Thanks for sharing this history lesson!

Bob Scotney said...

This side of the Atlantic I suppose Mamie Eisenhower was the first First Lady I remember but since the Kennedys we seem to hear more and more about them.
Sarah Polk must have created quite a stir. Now I will have to find out abut her husband

The Silver Fox said...

Polk is definitely one of the "forgotten" presidents... forgotten, or never even heard of by some, sadly. But even I knew nothing about his wife. Quite informative. Thanks!

Anna said...

What an incredible story she had, and so sad. That postcard is wonderful.

Margaret said...

She does look rather stylish... and I think they need the likes of her in the White House today! :)